Wednesday, April 16, 2014
medievalpoc:

Contemporary Art Week!
aseantoo submitted to medievalpoc:

TitarubiSurrounding David (2008)National Museum of SingaporeFrom here
Titarubi is one of Indonesia’s most important feminist artists, and she’s regularly got in trouble with conservative authorities over her installations that interrogate representation of the human body.
When invited to create a work in the colonial building of the National Museum of Singapore, she built an 850-metre tall replica of Michelangelo’s David (twice as tall as the original) and covered it with pink brocade - the same material used in sarong kebaya, the traditional women’s costume of Indonesia, Malaysia, Brunei and Singapore.

This was a monumental work of art that playfully feminised the male form and Asianized the European tradition. It had loads of visiting schoolkids in giggles over the colossal pink dong - but they loved it, all the same.


Love the use of brocade! (It makes more sense in the second picture.)

medievalpoc:

Contemporary Art Week!

aseantoo submitted to medievalpoc:

Titarubi
Surrounding David (2008)
National Museum of Singapore
From here

Titarubi is one of Indonesia’s most important feminist artists, and she’s regularly got in trouble with conservative authorities over her installations that interrogate representation of the human body.

When invited to create a work in the colonial building of the National Museum of Singapore, she built an 850-metre tall replica of Michelangelo’s David (twice as tall as the original) and covered it with pink brocade - the same material used in sarong kebaya, the traditional women’s costume of Indonesia, Malaysia, Brunei and Singapore.

This was a monumental work of art that playfully feminised the male form and Asianized the European tradition. It had loads of visiting schoolkids in giggles over the colossal pink dong - but they loved it, all the same.

Love the use of brocade! (It makes more sense in the second picture.)

Comments
Monday, April 14, 2014

The First Year Idea: Supporting First-Year First-Gen Composition Students

uwmenglish:

The Composition Professional Development Group focuses on the current status, available student resources, and potential university changes that may affect our first-year and first-generation college composition students.

The event will be held on Friday, April 18, from 1 p.m. - 3 p.m. in 368 Curtin Hall.

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Sunday, April 13, 2014

lagartazul:

 

This sounds perfect today.

(Source: floresenelatico)

Comments
Monday, April 7, 2014
theatlantic:

For Shame: The Giant Poster That Shows Drone Pilots the People They’re Bombing

A new project, initiated by a collective of artists from around the world including the French JR, has tried to reach the people pulling the trigger in America’s drone wars—the drone operators themselves.
It’s called “Not A Bug Splat,” and its gets its name from the term drone operators use for a successful “kill,” because—in the pixelated grayscale of the drone camera—ending a human life looks like squashing a bug. 
Read more. [Image: Not a Bug Splat]

theatlantic:

For Shame: The Giant Poster That Shows Drone Pilots the People They’re Bombing

A new project, initiated by a collective of artists from around the world including the French JR, has tried to reach the people pulling the trigger in America’s drone wars—the drone operators themselves.

It’s called “Not A Bug Splat,” and its gets its name from the term drone operators use for a successful “kill,” because—in the pixelated grayscale of the drone camera—ending a human life looks like squashing a bug.

Read more. [Image: Not a Bug Splat]

Comments
Sunday, April 6, 2014

"The function of being an artist for me … is that it’s an experimental area where I can test ways of thinking and operating and hopefully apply the results to real life. The advantage of testing them in an art context is that it doesn’t really matter if you fail. You can afford to take risks that you wouldn’t allow yourself in normal life. Having taken those risks and seen what freedoms they allow or what restrictions they impose, you are then free to extrapolate them into normal-life situation. That’s what I think is the function of culture - to teach you new way of dealing with the world.

"For example, one important idea for me has been to deliberately put people who aren’t qualified in any particular way into creative situations and say to them, ‘look, you can do it. You are capable of operating creatively, you don’t have to be skillful. It has to do with the way you use your brain, not your hands’."

Brian Eno, 1975 (via jessiethatcher)
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Tuesday, April 1, 2014
theatlantic:

The Feisty Feminism of “Girls Just Want to Have Fun,” 30 Years Later

It was 1983, and women were starting to get loud. In the academy, writers and theorists were debating prostitution, pornography, and BDSM. The Equal Rights Amendment was making its last rounds through Congress, passing in the House but not getting enough votes to be added to the Constitution. Alice Walker had just published The Color Purple. Across the Atlantic, Margaret Thatcher was continuing her reign as the first female prime minister of Britain.
And in New York City, a Queens native named Cyndi Lauper was about to make a declaration: “Girls Just Want to Have Fun.”
In the 30 years since Lauper released her career-defining hit, “Girls” has been described as a “rebellious sing-along,” a “feminist anthem,” even a symbol of the “pogo-punk unisex spirit of the irreverent and permissive early 1980s.” Bloggers have written odes to it, dance-recital choreographers have it flocked to it, a movie has been made in its honor. The accompanying album, She’s So Unusual, is being re-released in April, and the liner notes remind listeners that “beneath [the] sparkly veneer was a strong feminist message.”
Read more. [Image courtesy of Cyndi Lauper]


That movie was a taped-off-tv staple of my childhood.

theatlantic:

The Feisty Feminism of “Girls Just Want to Have Fun,” 30 Years Later

It was 1983, and women were starting to get loud. In the academy, writers and theorists were debating prostitution, pornography, and BDSM. The Equal Rights Amendment was making its last rounds through Congress, passing in the House but not getting enough votes to be added to the Constitution. Alice Walker had just published The Color Purple. Across the Atlantic, Margaret Thatcher was continuing her reign as the first female prime minister of Britain.

And in New York City, a Queens native named Cyndi Lauper was about to make a declaration: “Girls Just Want to Have Fun.”

In the 30 years since Lauper released her career-defining hit, “Girls” has been described as a “rebellious sing-along,” a “feminist anthem,” even a symbol of the “pogo-punk unisex spirit of the irreverent and permissive early 1980s.” Bloggers have written odes to it, dance-recital choreographers have it flocked to it, a movie has been made in its honor. The accompanying album, She’s So Unusual, is being re-released in April, and the liner notes remind listeners that “beneath [the] sparkly veneer was a strong feminist message.”

Read more. [Image courtesy of Cyndi Lauper]

That movie was a taped-off-tv staple of my childhood.

Comments

jtotheizzoe:

Through the Looking Glass, Into the Brain

Book review! I just read Neurocomic (Amazon), a new graphic novel by Drs. Hana Ros & Matteo Farinella (who is on Tumblr). While not perfect, it presents the history and science of brain research in a way I’ve never before seen. I wish there was more of this art/science crossover in science books, don’t you?

Neurocomic is one man’s Lewis Carroll-esque journey through the human brain (his own?), where, after becoming trapped in a daydream, he encounters micro-avatars of the very neuroscientists who first unlocked the secrets of neuroscience. He also gets some rather psychedelic biology lessons along the way, falling through axons, parachuting out of synaptic vesicles, fighting the Kraken (who I assume has come for revenge on all that giant squid axon research that scientists have done over the years), discovering the power of hallucinogens (the hard way… no, make that the FUN way), and even breaking up some fisticuffs between Messrs. Golgi and Ramon y Cajal.

But like any book that attempts to hit every highlight of neuroscience, as well as the people who have studied it, in less than 150 pages, it was often superficial, and I was left wanting in parts. This book’s a bit like the cerebral cortex in that way: Interesting and full of action, but ultimately concealing a lot of cool stuff going on underneath. While the text was a bit academic in parts, the illustrations are superb, both fantastic and fantastical. I half expected the Cheshire Cat to pop up (instead I got a talking version of Pavlov’s dog).

Neurocomic won’t leave you ready to enter a neuroscience PhD program, but it does present some amazing science in a genre-busting, outlandish, imaginative way. All in all, journey through the looking glass into an imaginary world inside our own minds. And isn’t that what reading a story is all about?

for the nephews?

Comments
Friday, March 28, 2014