Monday, August 4, 2014
Comments
Friday, August 1, 2014

laughingsquid:

‘Icheon Master Hand’, A Video Highlighting the Process of Four Korean Ceramics Masters

Gorgeous work being made here. I wish watching myself write were this interesting.

Comments
Thursday, June 5, 2014

jtotheizzoe:

Do you knit? Here’s some scientific proof that it’s good for you. 

Dedicated, calm, repetitive practice, just the sort you get from knitting, drawing, crafting, or practicing an instrument, can induce a “relaxation response”, essentially the opposite of “fight or flight.”

BrainCraft breaks down the needly neuropsychology for you.

For those of you who are interested in knitting and the brain, might I suggest you combine them like so:

(knitted brain by Karen Norberg/Boston Museum of Science)

What writing a dissertation on craft often takes me away from: actually crafting :(

Comments
Thursday, May 22, 2014

(Moving On from ainslie henderson on Vimeo)

I haven’t been able to actually get through watching this stop-motion animated yarn music video for the band James because of the waterballs rolling out of my eyes, but it is beautifully done.

(via)

Comments
Thursday, May 8, 2014

medievalpoc:

Various Textiles from the Cleveland Museum of Art’s Textile Gallery

The Cleveland Museum of Art recently added an expansion that included viewing space for its amazing collection of historical textiles. In addition, they have digitized hundreds of images from the gallery you can view on their website.

There are some things not to love about that Cleveland.com article. For example: “As you stand in the gallery looking at [an Uzbek surcoat], it’s fun to think about the journey it took from the Middle East to Cleveland before joining the museum’s collection in 1916.” Fun isn’t how I’d describe many museum acquisitions of the period. The piece was paid for, but the “snatching up” a wealthy Clevelander did, weirdly gleefully written about here, sounds questionable.

That said, the online collection is just. so. cool.

(Also: this is a better link to viewing everything.)

Comments
Friday, May 2, 2014
yes.

yes.

(Source: ronaelisa)

Comments
Wednesday, April 16, 2014
medievalpoc:

Contemporary Art Week!
aseantoo submitted to medievalpoc:

TitarubiSurrounding David (2008)National Museum of SingaporeFrom here
Titarubi is one of Indonesia’s most important feminist artists, and she’s regularly got in trouble with conservative authorities over her installations that interrogate representation of the human body.
When invited to create a work in the colonial building of the National Museum of Singapore, she built an 850-metre tall replica of Michelangelo’s David (twice as tall as the original) and covered it with pink brocade - the same material used in sarong kebaya, the traditional women’s costume of Indonesia, Malaysia, Brunei and Singapore.

This was a monumental work of art that playfully feminised the male form and Asianized the European tradition. It had loads of visiting schoolkids in giggles over the colossal pink dong - but they loved it, all the same.


Love the use of brocade! (It makes more sense in the second picture.)

medievalpoc:

Contemporary Art Week!

aseantoo submitted to medievalpoc:

Titarubi
Surrounding David (2008)
National Museum of Singapore
From here

Titarubi is one of Indonesia’s most important feminist artists, and she’s regularly got in trouble with conservative authorities over her installations that interrogate representation of the human body.

When invited to create a work in the colonial building of the National Museum of Singapore, she built an 850-metre tall replica of Michelangelo’s David (twice as tall as the original) and covered it with pink brocade - the same material used in sarong kebaya, the traditional women’s costume of Indonesia, Malaysia, Brunei and Singapore.

This was a monumental work of art that playfully feminised the male form and Asianized the European tradition. It had loads of visiting schoolkids in giggles over the colossal pink dong - but they loved it, all the same.

Love the use of brocade! (It makes more sense in the second picture.)

Comments
Monday, April 14, 2014

The First Year Idea: Supporting First-Year First-Gen Composition Students

uwmenglish:

The Composition Professional Development Group focuses on the current status, available student resources, and potential university changes that may affect our first-year and first-generation college composition students.

The event will be held on Friday, April 18, from 1 p.m. - 3 p.m. in 368 Curtin Hall.

Comments